Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando, from Omaha, Nebraska (April 23, 1924 - July 1, 2004)

In his teens

Stella Adler, teacher of the Stanislavsky system

1944: I Remember Mama

Young man on Broadway

Tallulah Bankhead dismissed Brando from The Eagle Has Two Heads, 1945...

... but she recommended him to Tennessee Williams

So significant they turned him into a postage stamp

So significant they turned the poster into a postage stamp

Brando and Kim Hunter in Streetcar Named Desire, 1947, directed by Elia Kazan

Brando, Hunter, and Jessica Tandy as Blanch DuBois in the original production of Streetcar

Thomas Hart Benton painting commissioned by David O. Selznick
for his wife Irene, producer of Streetcar Named Desire.

Brando and director Elia Kazan backstage at Streetcar

Publicity still of Brando's preparation for The Men (1950),
Brando's first movie. He spent a month in bed.

Scene from The Men, directed by Fred Zinnemann, featuring
Brando and Everett Sloane (Mr. Bernstein in Citizen Kane)

Publicity shot from the film version of Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
featuring Brando as Stanley Kowalski and Vivien Leigh as Blanche DuBois

Poster from the film version

The famous "Stella!" scene from Streetcar

The Simpson's all-musical parody of Streetcar.

Viva Zapata in 1952, directed by Elia Kazan and written by John Steinbeck

Brando as Mark Antony, proving he could do more than mumble:
Julius Ceasar
(1953), directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Brando as the iconic motorcycle rebel Johnny in
The Wild One
(1953), directed by László Benedek

Wax museum version of Johnny

 

Tom of Finland's first leather-man (1954), directly inspired by Johnny in The Wild One.
“That ’Streetcar’ Man has a new Desire!” was the tagline on the movie's poster.

Malcolm Johnson, reporter who exposed dockside corruption in a
series of articles for the New York Sun in 1949. He won the Pulitzer Prize.

The New York Sun's masthead.

The Manhattan docks in the late 40s.

The longshoremen of Manhattan's West Side, victims of the
mob violence and corruption captured in On the Waterfront (1954)